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Discuss Leveled Literacy Intervention and the LLI supporting resources.

Using F & P with students with disabilities Messages in this topic - RSS

User 582429
User 582429
Posts: 1


5/2/2016
User 582429
User 582429
Posts: 1
Should the administration of the F & P differ for those students with disabilities? Specifically, when students are retelling the story or asked comprehension questions?
<em>edited by User 582429 on 5/2/2016</em>
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 224


5/21/2016
Here is an earlier post that may help guide your assessments.


Sometimes students can decode words but they do not have conceptual "language" or they don't know what the words really mean. So, it is extremely important that the Comprehension part of the assessment be a conversation. This may take longer for some students, but we are trying to determine if they understood what they read. You may have to help them by scaffolding some language for them. Just be careful not to "lead" them to a conclusion. Kathy Northcutt, consultant

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Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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Stephens
Stephens
Posts: 1


13 days ago
Stephens
Stephens
Posts: 1
I am a little "frustrated', I guess, is the right word. I am the curriculum specialist for special education in my district. I have been trying to talk to others, research, etc. to find out some information on LLI and students with disabilities. Unfortunately, all I tend to get are vague responses that basically say that LLI is for all struggling readers and for students with disabilities - if their program defines or requires it. I guess the question I'm asking is: Where has F & P consultants actually worked, extensively, with implementing LLI with students with reading disabilities - these are students who are more than 1 year behind or they shouldn't be in special education. From that work, what has been learned about how it should best be used and to develop what skills? Where does it not best meet the needs and what should be do to supplement? To say, it should be used with anyone struggling with text demands is just too vague. I'm trying to be committed to building the skills of students with disabilities but we cannot ignore the ways they learn. The expense of the program makes it essential that we make goo decisions and know where it might need some extra help for students. Has there been any work with consultants who have done this> Thank you so much for your patience and time. Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Here is an earlier post that may help guide your assessments.


Sometimes students can decode words but they do not have conceptual "language" or they don't know what the words really mean. So, it is extremely important that the Comprehension part of the assessment be a conversation. This may take longer for some students, but we are trying to determine if they understood what they read. You may have to help them by scaffolding some language for them. Just be careful not to "lead" them to a conclusion. Kathy Northcutt, consultant
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 97


9 days ago
Stephens wrote:
I am a little "frustrated', I guess, is the right word. I am the curriculum specialist for special education in my district. I have been trying to talk to others, research, etc. to find out some information on LLI and students with disabilities. Unfortunately, all I tend to get are vague responses that basically say that LLI is for all struggling readers and for students with disabilities - if their program defines or requires it. I guess the question I'm asking is: Where has F & P consultants actually worked, extensively, with implementing LLI with students with reading disabilities - these are students who are more than 1 year behind or they shouldn't be in special education. From that work, what has been learned about how it should best be used and to develop what skills? Where does it not best meet the needs and what should be do to supplement? To say, it should be used with anyone struggling with text demands is just too vague. I'm trying to be committed to building the skills of students with disabilities but we cannot ignore the ways they learn. The expense of the program makes it essential that we make goo decisions and know where it might need some extra help for students. Has there been any work with consultants who have done this> Thank you so much for your patience and time. Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Here is an earlier post that may help guide your assessments.


Sometimes students can decode words but they do not have conceptual "language" or they don't know what the words really mean. So, it is extremely important that the Comprehension part of the assessment be a conversation. This may take longer for some students, but we are trying to determine if they understood what they read. You may have to help them by scaffolding some language for them. Just be careful not to "lead" them to a conclusion. Kathy Northcutt, consultant



Sorry it appears you get vague responses regarding LLI and SPED. That is because we try to respond to readers individually similar to the IEP's created for SPED where each student should get a plan that is designed to meet the specific needs of the child. The lessons in LLI should be used to individualize a student's learning even when in a small group. The teaching occurs WHILE each child is reading AS the child needs support, reteaching, or reinforcing. Thus no "research" can be done to report for a group such as "students with disabilities." Every child in an intervention is seen as a child with some kind of disability but responsive teaching is more about the abilities; observing and using those to help the child move forward using what IS working for each child. The teacher and the ability of the teacher is thus another variable that must be factored in. None of these variables are stable enough in every situation to meet requirements for most of the research reported yet it is exactly these variables that often make LLI most beneficial for SPED students. Many people out there have worked with SPED students in LLI but often that is not the makeup of the whole group so again not reported as such.

Please continue to read the research reports found in the EXPLORE/Intervention and the EXTEND/Research tabs above. Also there are some webinars under the EXTEND/Resource Library that may help explain this theory of responsive teaching.
Debbie
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