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Discuss Leveled Literacy Intervention and the LLI supporting resources.

Having student go back some levels Messages in this topic - RSS

SueR
SueR
Posts: 2


15 days ago
SueR
SueR
Posts: 2
I recently began doing some subbing as an interventionist and several of my students are just struggling through the level they are at. The reading is not fluent ( very word by word and labored) and word solving strategies are not secure at the levels they are at. This is tier 3 intervention for them and they have been in LLI since the beginning of this school year, having had other interventions in kindergarten and first grade. Is it ever ok to just back up a level or two? For example, one child reads independently at G, but is working at K in LLI.
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FPUser32232
FPUser32232
Posts: 2


15 days ago
FPUser32232
FPUser32232
Posts: 2
I have a similar concern. I did a benchmark assessment on my student and he is reading independently at level F. In his LLI group, they are working at I. This doesn't seem to make sense.
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 134


13 days ago
SueR wrote:
I recently began doing some subbing as an interventionist and several of my students are just struggling through the level they are at. The reading is not fluent ( very word by word and labored) and word solving strategies are not secure at the levels they are at. This is tier 3 intervention for them and they have been in LLI since the beginning of this school year, having had other interventions in kindergarten and first grade. Is it ever ok to just back up a level or two? For example, one child reads independently at G, but is working at K in LLI.

Great question. Of course you can repeat lessons or stop and reteach parts that the students don't seem to understand. This is what being a responsive teacher is all about. The hardest part of that is recording the lessons because it will mess up the numbering but please do what is best for the students. If they are not understanding the texts it does no good to keep moving. There are several suggestions in the FAQ's of the Program Guides to help think through areas that may need more work. Visit When Readers Struggle (WRS) for sections that address the needs of your students. Figure 21-13 beginning on p. 517 of WRS can help you find what you need.
Best wishes for success!
Debbie
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 134


13 days ago
FPUser32232 wrote:
I have a similar concern. I did a benchmark assessment on my student and he is reading independently at level F. In his LLI group, they are working at I. This doesn't seem to make sense.

Students often read independently at 2 levels higher than instruction. In the instruction groups the teacher is still supporting some of the work by providing a rich introduction, supportive teaching as needed during and after reading. The independent level gives evidence that the child can read the level with NO support from the teacher. Your student has a 3 level gap but that could be for various reasons. Visit When Readers Struggle chapter 3 to determine more precisely where the student has the most struggles and set your teaching priorities there. Note especially pages 41-43 of that chapter. You can then find the sections of the rest of the book that will help provide more explicit teaching in the areas of concern. The beginning pages of chapter 17 are also helpful in thinking about your reader and the role of different levels used in instruction (Independent & Instructional p. 407-408, 126).

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
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FPUser2616
FPUser2616
Posts: 2


11 days ago
FPUser2616
FPUser2616
Posts: 2
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
FPUser32232 wrote:
I have a similar concern. I did a benchmark assessment on my student and he is reading independently at level F. In his LLI group, they are working at I. This doesn't seem to make sense.

Students often read independently at 2 levels higher than instruction. In the instruction groups the teacher is still supporting some of the work by providing a rich introduction, supportive teaching as needed during and after reading. The independent level gives evidence that the child can read the level with NO support from the teacher. Your student has a 3 level gap but that could be for various reasons. Visit When Readers Struggle chapter 3 to determine more precisely where the student has the most struggles and set your teaching priorities there. Note especially pages 41-43 of that chapter. You can then find the sections of the rest of the book that will help provide more explicit teaching in the areas of concern. The beginning pages of chapter 17 are also helpful in thinking about your reader and the role of different levels used in instruction (Independent & Instructional p. 407-408, 126).

Best wishes for success!
Debbie


In your first sentence, you say, "Students often read independently at 2 levels higher than instruction." Is this statement correct, or did you mean to say, "Students often read independently at 2 levels lower than instruction?" The latter statement would appear to be the correct one.
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 134


10 days ago
FPUser2616 wrote:
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
FPUser32232 wrote:
I have a similar concern. I did a benchmark assessment on my student and he is reading independently at level F. In his LLI group, they are working at I. This doesn't seem to make sense.

Students often read independently at 2 levels higher than instruction. In the instruction groups the teacher is still supporting some of the work by providing a rich introduction, supportive teaching as needed during and after reading. The independent level gives evidence that the child can read the level with NO support from the teacher. Your student has a 3 level gap but that could be for various reasons. Visit When Readers Struggle chapter 3 to determine more precisely where the student has the most struggles and set your teaching priorities there. Note especially pages 41-43 of that chapter. You can then find the sections of the rest of the book that will help provide more explicit teaching in the areas of concern. The beginning pages of chapter 17 are also helpful in thinking about your reader and the role of different levels used in instruction (Independent & Instructional p. 407-408, 126).

Best wishes for success!
Debbie


In your first sentence, you say, "Students often read independently at 2 levels higher than instruction." Is this statement correct, or did you mean to say, "Students often read independently at 2 levels lower than instruction?" The latter statement would appear to be the correct one.

Thank you. Of course you are correct. I did mean the independent level can be two levels below the instruction level. I appreciate your clarifying this.
Debbie
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FPUser32232
FPUser32232
Posts: 2


7 days ago
FPUser32232
FPUser32232
Posts: 2
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
FPUser32232 wrote:
I have a similar concern. I did a benchmark assessment on my student and he is reading independently at level F. In his LLI group, they are working at I. This doesn't seem to make sense.

Students often read independently at 2 levels higher than instruction. In the instruction groups the teacher is still supporting some of the work by providing a rich introduction, supportive teaching as needed during and after reading. The independent level gives evidence that the child can read the level with NO support from the teacher. Your student has a 3 level gap but that could be for various reasons. Visit When Readers Struggle chapter 3 to determine more precisely where the student has the most struggles and set your teaching priorities there. Note especially pages 41-43 of that chapter. You can then find the sections of the rest of the book that will help provide more explicit teaching in the areas of concern. The beginning pages of chapter 17 are also helpful in thinking about your reader and the role of different levels used in instruction (Independent & Instructional p. 407-408, 126).

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 134


5 days ago
FPUser32232 wrote:
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
FPUser32232 wrote:
I have a similar concern. I did a benchmark assessment on my student and he is reading independently at level F. In his LLI group, they are working at I. This doesn't seem to make sense.

Students often read independently at 2 levels LOWER than instruction. In the instruction groups the teacher is still supporting some of the work by providing a rich introduction, supportive teaching as needed during and after reading. The independent level gives evidence that the child can read the level with NO support from the teacher. Your student has a 3 level gap but that could be for various reasons. Visit When Readers Struggle chapter 3 to determine more precisely where the student has the most struggles and set your teaching priorities there. Note especially pages 41-43 of that chapter. You can then find the sections of the rest of the book that will help provide more explicit teaching in the areas of concern. The beginning pages of chapter 17 are also helpful in thinking about your reader and the role of different levels used in instruction (Independent & Instructional p. 407-408, 126).

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
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