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1 hours ago
Topic:
When to stop testing?

Copey3
Copey3
Posts: 1
Copey3
Copey3
Posts: 1
Topic: When to stop testing?
When do we stop testing a child's level, as we were always trained that we stop at frustration level? We have always understood that we need to find their highest instructional level. It came up yesterday at a meeting that we could stop if they met their End of Year grade level requirement.
edited by Copey3 on 4/26/2017
3 hours ago
Topic:
LLI

linen
linen
Posts: 3
linen
linen
Posts: 3
Topic: LLI
If you do not understand the Linux system Arduino Kit, it may be somewhat difficult. But you are starting to play the robot, how can I not learn Linux? I was through the "bird brother of the Linux private kitchens" self-study Linux, and later tried to build Linux from the source code, and finally overcome the Windows system environment grew up on the command line to resist the psychological
3 hours ago
Topic:
BAS and F.&P.'s Scholastic Leveled Libraries

linen
linen
Posts: 3
Because I did not H bridge the bridge PCB Fabrication, so I did not achieve this program.Arduino as mechanical master control. I do not have a bridging bridge PCB prototyping, but there is a motor stacking shield for Arduino, the H bridge on Arduino nrf24l01 arduino. So I simply use Arduino responsible for the mechanical (motor + steering gear) laser cutting service, the equivalent of the body; raspberry pie is only responsible for image recognition grbl arduino, the equivalent of the brain. Arduino is not a Linux system ov7670, ssh can not go directly to write procedures, need to write led matrix driver after the compiler upload. I used the data cable to connect the raspberry pie and Arduino, in the raspberry sent to write after the program upload. I found a very useful command line IDE: PlatformIO (also has a great graphical interface editor). The installation process on Linux is based on Python 2.7 arduino hx711. You need some initialization, if like me is Arduino Uno motherboard, enter the following command can be.
3 hours ago
Topic:
Unlined Writing Pages

linen
linen
Posts: 3
linen
linen
Posts: 3
Topic: Unlined Writing Pages
Raspberry pie as mechanical master control Arduino. I think the essence of the microcontroller, not the size of small, but the rich GPIO (General Purpose Input-Output) PCB assembly, they are the dialogue window with the outside world. You see a variety of electronic components, pcb assembly probes, welding, breadboard, are dealing with GPIO. You need to understand the basic circuit knowledge PCB prototype, but also need to know that they are arranged in the microcontroller. Raspberry has a very easy to use GPIO 3144 Python library: gpiozero, use the method at a glance SIM808.Usually with four ports to control the motor, respectively, sensor to connect the two positive and negative motor, through the forward / reverse rotation of each motor to achieve the car forward / backward / steering. The standard circuit model that implements bidirectional current is the H bridge. You can buy a basic H-bridge module.
4 days ago
Topic:
How to Link BAS scores with LLI folders?

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 142
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Matilda wrote:
Hi Debbie, I'm so sorry I put the wrong page down! It's Pg. 31 not 32. If I have a child in Grade 3 and the BAS level is "N". How do I know which LLI folder to grab to start some interventions? Looking at Pg. 31 I am assuming I could start at Red LLI Level 65. My problem is I don't have this information for my Kinders, Gr. 1 & 2 students. I hope this makes a bit more sense now! Thanks for your efforts.
`

Matilda,
I'm not sure what you mean. My Red System Guide p. 32 is about pacing the lessons. Do you mean the Lesson Guide Organization charts that tell how many lessons are in each Lesson Guide volume? I'm not sure how the BAS scores and LLI folders fit in here? Could you provide a bit more information about what you need, please?
Debbie

Ok, Yes, now I see what you need. You want the levels of the lessons in each system. Those charts were not in the Primary System Guides. Instead there is a Book Chart in the Appendix of the Guides. Also each lesson in the Lesson Guides have the level on them. There may be charts under the LLI information brochures under the Explore tab. I will have to check.
In the meantime, here is the information for you:

Orange Lessons 1-10 Getting Started/Lessons 11-30 Level A / Lessons 31-50 Level B / Lessons 51-70 Level C Do you have the new systems that go beyond to include the Booster packs for Orange and Green?
Green Lessons: 1-10 Getting Started / Lessons 11-20 A /21-30 B / 31-40 C/ 41-50 D/ 51-60 E /61-70 F /71-80 G / 81-90 H /91-100 I / 101-110 J
Blue Lessons: 1-10 C /11-20 D/ 21-30 E / 31-40 F / 41-50 G / 51-60 H / 61-70 I / 71-80 J / 81-90 K / 91-100 L / 101-110 M / 111-120 N

Debbie
Matilda,
I didn't find a chart printed in any of the online resources. The Book Charts in the first edition has that information which I recopied above. The new editions may have that chart of the Lesson Guide contents like those in the Intermediate Systems.
Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
How to Link BAS scores with LLI folders?

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 142
Matilda wrote:
Hi Debbie, I'm so sorry I put the wrong page down! It's Pg. 31 not 32. If I have a child in Grade 3 and the BAS level is "N". How do I know which LLI folder to grab to start some interventions? Looking at Pg. 31 I am assuming I could start at Red LLI Level 65. My problem is I don't have this information for my Kinders, Gr. 1 & 2 students. I hope this makes a bit more sense now! Thanks for your efforts.
`

Matilda,
I'm not sure what you mean. My Red System Guide p. 32 is about pacing the lessons. Do you mean the Lesson Guide Organization charts that tell how many lessons are in each Lesson Guide volume? I'm not sure how the BAS scores and LLI folders fit in here? Could you provide a bit more information about what you need, please?
Debbie
Ok, Yes, now I see what you need. You want the levels of the lessons in each system. Those charts were not in the Primary System Guides. Instead there is a Book Chart in the Appendix of the Guides. Also each lesson in the Lesson Guides have the level on them. There may be charts under the LLI information brochures under the Explore tab. I will have to check.
In the meantime, here is the information for you:

Orange Lessons 1-10 Getting Started/Lessons 11-30 Level A / Lessons 31-50 Level B / Lessons 51-70 Level C Do you have the new systems that go beyond to include the Booster packs for Orange and Green?
Green Lessons: 1-10 Getting Started / Lessons 11-20 A /21-30 B / 31-40 C/ 41-50 D/ 51-60 E /61-70 F /71-80 G / 81-90 H /91-100 I / 101-110 J
Blue Lessons: 1-10 C /11-20 D/ 21-30 E / 31-40 F / 41-50 G / 51-60 H / 61-70 I / 71-80 J / 81-90 K / 91-100 L / 101-110 M / 111-120 N

Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
How to Link BAS scores with LLI folders?

Matilda
Matilda
Posts: 2
Hi Debbie, I'm so sorry I put the wrong page down! It's Pg. 31 not 32. If I have a child in Grade 3 and the BAS level is "N". How do I know which LLI folder to grab to start some interventions? Looking at Pg. 31 I am assuming I could start at Red LLI Level 65. My problem is I don't have this information for my Kinders, Gr. 1 & 2 students. I hope this makes a bit more sense now! Thanks for your efforts.
`
Matilda,
I'm not sure what you mean. My Red System Guide p. 32 is about pacing the lessons. Do you mean the Lesson Guide Organization charts that tell how many lessons are in each Lesson Guide volume? I'm not sure how the BAS scores and LLI folders fit in here? Could you provide a bit more information about what you need, please?
Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
How to Link BAS scores with LLI folders?

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 142
Matilda wrote:
I need help! How do I effectively link my BAS scores to the LLI folders? Unfortunately our 'System Guides' for the levels I need no longer seem to be in my school, oops! In the Red systems guide the information is on Pg. 32 Section 3. There is a great LLI Red System Guide Organization chart but I also need to find it for the Orange Level (Kinder.), Green (Gr. 1), Blue (Gr. 2). I can't seem to find it! Can anyone help me? Thanks


`

Matilda,
I'm not sure what you mean. My Red System Guide p. 32 is about pacing the lessons. Do you mean the Lesson Guide Organization charts that tell how many lessons are in each Lesson Guide volume? I'm not sure how the BAS scores and LLI folders fit in here? Could you provide a bit more information about what you need, please?
Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
How to Link BAS scores with LLI folders?

Matilda
Matilda
Posts: 2
I need help! How do I effectively link my BAS scores to the LLI folders? Unfortunately our 'System Guides' for the levels I need no longer seem to be in my school, oops! In the Red systems guide the information is on Pg. 31 Section 3. There is a great LLI Red System Guide Organization chart but I also need to find it for the Orange Level (Kinder.), Green (Gr. 1), Blue (Gr. 2). I can't seem to find it! Can anyone help me? Thanks


`
edited by Matilda on 4/21/2017
8 days ago
Topic:
High Frequency Word lists

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 142
FPUser15268 wrote:
I am working to determine high frequency lists for grade level for each nine week period in our K-4 building. I am using the BAS 1 for grades K-2, but I am having difficulty breaking the word lists into grade levels and 9 weeks. I know K has the 25 word list, but our district is setting the expectation higher than K students only learning 25 words. Is there another document that has specific grade level lists using the word lists from the BAS? Also, what are those lists based on? Fry? Dolch? Thanks for any insight!



This is a great question and one that comes up frequently so I am going to elaborate a bit on the rationale that goes beyond your question.


High Frequency (HF) words refer to a collection of words that a child can read AND write with automaticity. Fry, Dolch, and Fountas and Pinnell selected words that are used most often in the English language texts. However, the explanations of HF words found in the Literacy Continuum, Guided Reading, and Phonics Lessons mention the value of these words to readers and writers beyond just reading them with automaticity. They are also high utility words that help in solving other words.


Fountas and Pinnell suggest that Kinder students have a core of about 25 words "...along with a few specialized words they have encountered. Many children will know more words; ...the precise collection does not have to be the same for every child..." (Word Matters p. 89) The focus is on learning "how to learn words" and how to use known letters, words, spelling patterns, word structures, and word meanings to learn and/or solve new words; use them as resources that will help them learn to read and write other words. The Fountas and Pinnell Phonics Lessons have lessons for teaching HF words each month of the school year, but also provide lessons for the other categories of word solving. This is where the list of 25 words for Kinder assessment originated.


Once students understand how to attend to the print, how to use known to get to new, and how to use the parts in flexible ways they will be able to "memorize more basic sight words for automaticity," to have a repertoire of 100 words by the end of first grade. If you teach the children how to use spelling patterns then you do not need to teach every word that uses the pattern. For example if a child learns can and learns how to change can to make man, fan, pan then the child knows how to make most if not all of the -an words so all of those words are not on the list. It is more important to teach the Kinder children to become word solvers than to just learn words.


The texts that most kinder students are reading independently probably have a limited number of HF words in them. Sample your Guided Reading Library texts for levels A-D to establish the list for your Kinder students. Include the Word Writing Assessment found in BAS Optional Assessments to observe how children can generate words.


When Readers Struggle p. 471 cautions us that "the intensive testing of knowledge of isolated units of language has reached an all-time high, and instruction has generally followed suit. ... We sometimes forget that a measure of progress that is easy to analyze statistically is not necessarily a measure of good instruction." Don't get too hung up on the numbers of words, especially for Kinder, but focus on the "how to learn the words." Word Matters is an excellent resource that explains this in more detail.


Thank you for your question but keep thinking about the why behind the tests and challenge the district with your rationales based on what is best for children.
8 days ago
Topic:
High Frequency Word lists

FPUser15268
FPUser15268
Posts: 1
I am working to determine high frequency lists for grade level for each nine week period in our K-4 building. I am using the BAS 1 for grades K-2, but I am having difficulty breaking the word lists into grade levels and 9 weeks. I know K has the 25 word list, but our district is setting the expectation higher than K students only learning 25 words. Is there another document that has specific grade level lists using the word lists from the BAS? Also, what are those lists based on? Fry? Dolch? Thanks for any insight!
11 days ago
Topic:
Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) workshops

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 254
Customer Feedback wrote:
I was so excited to hear about your new LLI workshop and kit! I have asked my district to send me to Chicago this Oct. I loved the Colorado workshop and the Benchmark kit. You two ladies are incredible!

Contributed by: Maureen - Connetquot School District in New York
edited by margaret.broucek@heinemann.com on 3/17/2010


Thank you, Maureen, for your kind words. We, at Heinemann, are honored to support teachers who wish to be change agents for their students.
11 days ago
Topic:
Using LLI with ELLs

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 254
FPUser35478 wrote:
Thank you for the response. If I understood your response correctly, it sounds like this program is best used when the ELL teacher can support what the Title Teacher already does with the student, by going deeper by employing suggested embedded supports for ELL students.

A couple more questions that are related:

1) Would it ever be appropriate for the same student to work with two different colors per day? For example, one color's lesson with the Title Reading teacher and another color's lesson with the ELL specialist? Since some of the levels overlap in the different colors?

2) Also, I read that it is meant for instruction once per day. If a specialist is only scheduled with a student for two or three times per week, would it still be appropriate to use the program that often? Or if the ELL specialist would need to address different academic needs rather than literacy every so often and need to skip some days or even a week of Fountas & Pinnell? (Some ELL programs are not designed to solely teach pull out literacy lessons for their population of students.) Or should this program really only be used when it can occur every day without any gaps?

Thanks so much for your guidance and support.


On the last page of every LLI lesson, you will find suggestions for fine-tuning the lesson to support English language learners. You might use these suggestions to revisit the text for increased understanding or clarification. You will also find a section related to English Language Learners in the Program and System guides. (Also see When Readers Struggle, Chapter 18.) You might examine where your students need more explicit instruction. Is it Fluency? Comprehension? Phonics? Writing? There are suggestions given in the Frequently Asked Questions of the Primary Program Guides and Intermediate System Guides with regard to supporting these strategies.
I hope this helps.


1) Since the LLI lessons are so intensive, it would not be advisable to do two lessons on the same day with the same students.



"Struggling readers/writers may have difficulty sustaining independent work. Extending the extra instruction into reading, writing, drawing, or working with phonics in the classroom (or during additional ELL specialist time) gives it extra impact. It’s also important for intervention and classroom teachers to continually discuss and share records of student progress. When you work as a team to support struggling readers, they will have the best chance for success. They will thrive when there is a cohesive, coordinated effort on their behalf." (Fountas and Pinnell, Leveled Literacy Intervention, Heinemann 2009).
2) Using the LLI systems which contain consistent quality instruction with high quality texts, two or three times per week will still have an impact on student progress. However, we would not expect inconsistent lessons to accomplish the same accelerated progress. Students will require a longer program of support.
"Struggling readers need a predictable, consistent schedule of instruction. Daily supplemental instruc- tion helps them gain momentum; you can reinforce and build on what was learned the day before. They need to read and reread texts and engage in writing about reading with the fewest possible time gaps between lessons. We recommend a thirty-minute les- son that includes daily instruction in reading, writing, and phonics/word study so that learning can be rein- forced and progress accelerated." (Fountas and Pinnell, Leveled Literacy Intervention, Heinemann 2009).
We wish you the best as you provide support for your ELL students.
11 days ago
Topic:
Using LLI with ELLs

FPUser35478
FPUser35478
Posts: 2
Thank you for the response. If I understood your response correctly, it sounds like this program is best used when the ELL teacher can support what the Title Teacher already does with the student, by going deeper by employing suggested embedded supports for ELL students.

A couple more questions that are related:

1) Would it ever be appropriate for the same student to work with two different colors per day? For example, one color's lesson with the Title Reading teacher and another color's lesson with the ELL specialist? Since some of the levels overlap in the different colors?

2) Also, I read that it is meant for instruction once per day. If a specialist is only scheduled with a student for two or three times per week, would it still be appropriate to use the program that often? Or if the ELL specialist would need to address different academic needs rather than literacy every so often and need to skip some days or even a week of Fountas & Pinnell? (Some ELL programs are not designed to solely teach pull out literacy lessons for their population of students.) Or should this program really only be used when it can occur every day without any gaps?

Thanks so much for your guidance and support.


On the last page of every LLI lesson, you will find suggestions for fine-tuning the lesson to support English language learners. You might use these suggestions to revisit the text for increased understanding or clarification. You will also find a section related to English Language Learners in the Program and System guides. (Also see When Readers Struggle, Chapter 18.) You might examine where your students need more explicit instruction. Is it Fluency? Comprehension? Phonics? Writing? There are suggestions given in the Frequently Asked Questions of the Primary Program Guides and Intermediate System Guides with regard to supporting these strategies.
I hope this helps.
12 days ago
Topic:
Using LLI with ELLs

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 254
FPUser35478 wrote:
In our school, some ELL students qualify and are required (based on state regulations) to work with the Title Reading teacher AND the ELL Specialist. Would it be appropriate for ELLs to receive instruction from LLI more than once per day? If so, what could the logistics of such an arrangement be? If not, what would be a good program to compliment or supplement the use of LLI?






On the last page of every LLI lesson, you will find suggestions for fine-tuning the lesson to support English language learners. You might use these suggestions to revisit the text for increased understanding or clarification. You will also find a section related to English Language Learners in the Program and System guides. (Also see When Readers Struggle, Chapter 18.) You might examine where your students need more explicit instruction. Is it Fluency? Comprehension? Phonics? Writing? There are suggestions given in the Frequently Asked Questions of the Primary Program Guides and Intermediate System Guides with regard to supporting these strategies.
I hope this helps.
12 days ago
Topic:
Assessing comprehension

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 254
Chicagoreads wrote:
Hello, I have a student with severe word retrieval issues. It is very hard for him to recall details of stories without some verbal prompts. Is there a way to give him multiple choice questions on the BAS? Thank you!


Fountas and Pinnell state that we can rephrase the question one time, if necessary, as long as we do not provide the answer in our prompting. In the Frequently Asked Questions section the closest question/answer: What if a child does not understand a prompt? It is permissible to rephrase the prompt once to provide the maximum opportunity for the child to understand what you are asking him. Your goal is to determine whether the child understands the information in the story, not whether he understood the question. But you should not paraphrase again and again because this will draw you into leading the child to the answer and you will not get an accurate view of the child’s comprehension. Just try one time. Another question that might be closely related: Should I administer the assessment to a student who speaks very little English? We suggest that you follow your school policy regarding the assessment of students whose first language is not English. If you would administer other standardized tests to those students, then you should administer this one. You will find that the gradient of texts allows most children to at least begin to engage in the reading process. Perhaps this is a question for your literacy team or special education teachers. What is your district willing to allow when a student has an IEP, Individualized Education Program?

I hope this helps as you and your staff debate this issue.
12 days ago
Topic:
Using LLI with ELLs

FPUser35478
FPUser35478
Posts: 2
In our school, some ELL students qualify and are required (based on state regulations) to work with the Title Reading teacher AND the ELL Specialist. Would it be appropriate for ELLs to receive instruction from LLI more than once per day? If so, what could the logistics of such an arrangement be? If not, what would be a good program to compliment or supplement the use of LLI?
12 days ago
Topic:
Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) workshops

Meg B.
Meg B.
Posts: 2
Irene and Gay wrote:
Dear Ann and Tanya,

This comment is based on research summarized by the National Reading Panel in their longer (unabridged) report. As they synthesized findings from research, they found that shorter programs (around 10 hours or less) were very effective and longer programs were no more effective and were sometimes less effective. I believe that we report this finding in our books on phonics. The point is that phonemic awareness is extremely important and most children need instruction. But we do not need to continue it after children have learned to hear and manipulate sounds. They also found that teaching letters and sounds together was very effective, and that is called phonics.

Hope this helps, Gay and Irene
12 days ago
Topic:
Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) workshops

Meg B.
Meg B.
Posts: 2
Thanks so much for directing us to research! It's always so good to go to the source.
I'm looking at the NRP right now and I can't seem to find the section you're citing. Can you help me find it? What I've found (through looking less through the text less than methodically) seems to recommend that it may take up to 20 hours for students to reach the required level of skill.

Irene and Gay wrote:
Dear Ann and Tanya,

This comment is based on research summarized by the National Reading Panel in their longer (unabridged) report. As they synthesized findings from research, they found that shorter programs (around 10 hours or less) were very effective and longer programs were no more effective and were sometimes less effective. I believe that we report this finding in our books on phonics. The point is that phonemic awareness is extremely important and most children need instruction. But we do not need to continue it after children have learned to hear and manipulate sounds. They also found that teaching letters and sounds together was very effective, and that is called phonics.

Hope this helps, Gay and Irene
13 days ago
Topic:
Assessing comprehension

Chicagoreads
Chicagoreads
Posts: 1
Hello, I have a student with severe word retrieval issues. It is very hard for him to recall details of stories without some verbal prompts. Is there a way to give him multiple choice questions on the BAS? Thank you!




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